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radoration.

an adoration of all things rad

Dec 9th, 2012 @ 4:12 pm

Peter Zumthor’s house

via vforvision

Reblogged from • catherine's inspiration •.

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Sep 9th, 2012 @ 11:06 am

Architects propose a floating airport for London

Architectural firm Gensler is proposing the construction of a floating airport on the surface of London’s River Thames Estuary. Dubbed the London Britannia Airport, its concourse would sit in the center of the Thames Estuary, surrounded by runways that float, and tethered to the seabed. The primary access route would be a new high-speed underground railway offering direct links to London and Europe. It’s a hugely ambitious project with an estimated cost of £50 billion (around $80 billion). Floating airports and runways have been proposed in the past across the world, but few have made it past the planning phase, and those that did have since been dismantled.
Gensler’s concept isn’t the first for a Thames Estuary Airport, but it’s certainly the best looking. There have been multiple proposals dating back to the 1940s, and just last year a man-made island close to the mouth of the River Thames was suggested as the answer to London’s air congestion. Plans to expand London’s largest airport, Heathrow, have been vigorously opposed by local residents and are the source of constant political debate. Gensler’s proposal includes turning Heathrow into an eco-village, with the excess traffic being diverted to the four runways at Britannia Airport.
via theverge

Architects propose a floating airport for London

Architectural firm Gensler is proposing the construction of a floating airport on the surface of London’s River Thames Estuary. Dubbed the London Britannia Airport, its concourse would sit in the center of the Thames Estuary, surrounded by runways that float, and tethered to the seabed. The primary access route would be a new high-speed underground railway offering direct links to London and Europe. It’s a hugely ambitious project with an estimated cost of £50 billion (around $80 billion). Floating airports and runways have been proposed in the past across the world, but few have made it past the planning phase, and those that did have since been dismantled.

Gensler’s concept isn’t the first for a Thames Estuary Airport, but it’s certainly the best looking. There have been multiple proposals dating back to the 1940s, and just last year a man-made island close to the mouth of the River Thames was suggested as the answer to London’s air congestion. Plans to expand London’s largest airport, Heathrow, have been vigorously opposed by local residents and are the source of constant political debate. Gensler’s proposal includes turning Heathrow into an eco-village, with the excess traffic being diverted to the four runways at Britannia Airport.

via theverge

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Aug 10th, 2012 @ 12:55 pm

Quinta da Regaleira-Sintra ~ Portugal

An underground tunnel with a spiral staircase, supported by carved columns, down to the bottom of the well through nine landings. The nine hole round landings, separated by fifteen steps, evoke references to Dante’s Divine Comedy, and may represent the nine circles of hell, paradise, or purgatory.

The well is connected to laberíticas caves that lead to a spooky garden surrounded by a lake.

The land that is now Quinta da Regaleira had many owners through time. But in 1892 it belonged to the Barons of Regaleira, a family of rich merchants from Porto, when it was purchased that year by Carvalho Monteiro for 25,000 réis. Monteiro wished to build a bewildering place where he could gather symbols that would reflect his interests and ideologies. With the assistance of the Italian architect Luigi Manini, he designed the 4-hectare estate with its enigmatic buildings, believed to hide symbols related to alchemy, Masonry, the Knights Templar, and the Rosicrucians. The architecture of the estate evokes Roman, Gothic, Renaissance and Manueline architectural styles. The construction of the current estate commenced in 1904 and most of it was concluded by 1910.

via emmakale

Reblogged from Life is fast..

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Feb 28th, 2012 @ 5:02 pm

Why 'The Death of Architecture' May Not Be Such a Bad Thing

*Not that I’m an expert, but it seems like the old model of this profession is dying. And I am all for that. Architects seem far too concerned with permitting and codes to satisfy the uninspired designs of pretentious clients. (Sorry, too many adjectives) I would like to see the scope and scale of architecture grow. The field is educated and ambitious. It should expand its focus to solving problems and move the profession forward.

Architecture conjures up all sorts of images in the minds of non-architects: rolls of blueprints, soaring buildings, a life of glamour and fame. But even the most famous architects say the past and present realities of the profession are markedly different. Becoming an architect today requires grueling hours, a disproportionate amount of education,years-long licensing hurdles, and finicky clients, while yielding relatively low pay and career stability compared to other learned professions.

More detrimentally for both the public’s perception and opportunities within the field, architecture remains a luxury available only to a privileged few. The field has long wrestled with its elitism; books have been written, conferences staged, and museum exhibitions mounted around estimates that architecture and good design are accessible to only a select sliver of the population. Yet architecture shapes everyone by creating the environments around us, impacting our collective quality of life. As philosopher Alain de Botton once wrote, “Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on the notion that we are, for better or worse, different people in different places—and on the conviction that it is architecture’s task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be.”

*Btw, this not an indictment of my former classmates. With only a couple exceptions, I find them to be the most inspiring and clever people I know. I don’t worry about their futures. I worry for those who have less drive and skill.

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Feb 12th, 2012 @ 4:35 pm

Modern Architecture Game

I’m geeking out over the Modern Architecture Game created by NEXT Architects. Test your knowledge of modern architecture with almost 1000 questions about the world’s most famous architects, buildings and trends of the Western architecture.
 The goal is similar to that of Trivial Pursuit – reach the heart of the board before anyone else. There are six different categories of questions: Visuals, Architect, Project, Style, Influence and Quote, and once you’ve moved through them all, and beat your opponents to the center of the board, you can declare yourself king of all nerds things architecture.

*Ridiculous.

Modern Architecture Game

I’m geeking out over the Modern Architecture Game created by NEXT Architects. Test your knowledge of modern architecture with almost 1000 questions about the world’s most famous architects, buildings and trends of the Western architecture.

 The goal is similar to that of Trivial Pursuit – reach the heart of the board before anyone else. There are six different categories of questions: Visuals, Architect, Project, Style, Influence and Quote, and once you’ve moved through them all, and beat your opponents to the center of the board, you can declare yourself king of all nerds things architecture.

*Ridiculous.

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Oct 23rd, 2011 @ 1:56 pm

Olafur Eliasson, Umschreibung, 2004
via cartograp

Olafur EliassonUmschreibung, 2004

via cartograp

Reblogged from everywhere art.

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Oct 13th, 2011 @ 4:02 am

Reblogged from futura.

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Jul 15th, 2011 @ 5:29 pm

“Six-Story Vertical Garden Sprouts in San Vicente Town Square” 
designed by architect Jose Maria Chofre

(via Inhabitat, via Urbanarbolismo) via karenh

“Six-Story Vertical Garden Sprouts in San Vicente Town Square”

designed by architect Jose Maria Chofre

(via Inhabitat, via Urbanarbolismo) via karenh

Reblogged from daily design discoveries.

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Apr 2nd, 2011 @ 11:54 am

HOLLOW BUILDING


The Jin-Mao Towner in Shanghai, China is amazing. The main feature is an atrium with a piano bar at the bottom. It is 38 stories down with an dramatic view. More here.

If you want consistent examples of cutting-edge architecture, you should look to China. I don’t know what considerations architects are taking into account when building there, but there’s a great opportunity for efficient/sustainable infrastructure that cuts down on some of the side effects of China’s rapid industrialization (aka pollution, mining bits mixed into the air, etc.).
via cthrin:gregmelander

HOLLOW BUILDING

The Jin-Mao Towner in Shanghai, China is amazing. The main feature is an atrium with a piano bar at the bottom. It is 38 stories down with an dramatic view. More here.

If you want consistent examples of cutting-edge architecture, you should look to China. I don’t know what considerations architects are taking into account when building there, but there’s a great opportunity for efficient/sustainable infrastructure that cuts down on some of the side effects of China’s rapid industrialization (aka pollution, mining bits mixed into the air, etc.).

via cthrin:gregmelander

Reblogged from • catherine's inspiration •.

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Mar 17th, 2011 @ 1:00 pm

The Ascension of Peter Zumthor

Peter Zumthor, who recently won the Pritzker Prize after a career of few buildings and mostly modest-in-size projects, on the “architecture of actually making things”

*Zumthor has always been one of my favorites. Such class. Amazingly solid body of work.

In any case, as the designer of some of the subtlest and most admired buildings of the last quarter-century, Zumthor has hardly been toiling in obscurity. But he has eschewed the flamboyant, billboard-on-the-skyline, globe-trotting celebrity persona, setting himself apart from, and in his own mind clearly somewhat above, some of his more famous colleagues. His works, even from the most superficial perspective, differ from Frank Gehry’s or Zaha Hadid’s or Jean Nouvel’s or Norman Foster’s, for starters, because they are not flashy: they often don’t grab you at all at first glance, being conceived from the inside out, usually over many painstaking years. Moreover, because Zumthor runs a small office and doesn’t often delegate even the choice of a door handle, he hasn’t taken on many projects, and most of the ones he has completed aren’t very big.

As Peter Rüedi, a Swiss critic, wrote recently in the Neue Zürcher Zeitung, what results might lead people to mistake Zumthor at first for “an ascetic.” But “he is the opposite,” Rüedi rightly noted. He is “an essentialist of the sensual.”

(Source: longform.org)

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