This is me.

Darin...

Following

Search


radoration.

an adoration of all things rad

Jan 6th, 2013 @ 8:04 am

Obama's gift to al-Qaida, support for tyranny, and FBI monitoring of dissent

(1) I can’t recall any one news article that so effectively conveys both the gross immorality and the strategic stupidity of Obama’s drone attacks asthis one from Monday’s Washington Postby Sudarsan Raghavan. It details how the US-supported Yemeni dictatorship lies to its public each time the US kills Yemeni civilians with a drone attack, and how these civilian-killing attacks are relentlessly (and predictably) driving Yemenis to support al-Qaida and devote themselves to anti-American militancy:


"Since the attack, militants in the tribal areas surrounding Radda have gained more recruits and supporters in their war against the Yemeni government and its key backer, the United States. The two survivors and relatives of six victims, interviewed separately and speaking to a Western journalist about the incident for the first time, expressed willingness to support or even fight alongside AQAP, as the al-Qaeda group is known.

“‘Our entire village is angry at the government and the Americans,’ Mohammed said. ‘If the Americans are responsible, I would have no choice but to sympathize with al-Qaeda because al-Qaeda is fighting America.’

*It’s crazy how little of this is covered by big media. How is this president seen as a ‘liberal’ again?!? Why does he get a free pass to support tyrants and bomb the middle east?

(2) Speaking of the “why-do-they-hate-us?” question, the Bahraini democracy activist Zainab al-Khawaja has a powerful Op-Ed in the New York Times detailing the extreme brutality and repression of the regime against its own citizens, and explaining the self-destructive though steadfast support for that regime by the US and its close Saudi allies

Comments (View)

Nov 19th, 2012 @ 8:49 am

Update on Gaza, Day 6

According to the New York Times, 19 more people have been killed in Gaza since midnight local time, bringing a current death toll up to 91, with 700 wounded (200 of those being children). According to Health Ministry official Ashraf Al-Kidra, civilians make up half of the Palestinian death toll. [Update: According to Al Jazeera’s figures, it’s 96.]

This morning an Israeli airstrike hit the Shurooq media center, a high-rise in Gaza City where a number of media organizations, both local and foreign, have their offices. The building houses Hamas’ television station, Al Aqsa, and this is the second strike on the building within two days. BBC journalist Paul Danahar tweeted a photo of the media center just after the strike (included in the above photoset).

Mona Mahmood of The Guardian interviewed West Bank resident Sameeh Muhssein about demonstrations in the West Bank in solidarity with Gaza. He said:

The Palestinian Authority is trying to stop the protesters … under the pretext of not having more causalities [sic]. If the aggression continued on Gaza, I can promise you there will be a third intifada as the political solution looks really futile and people are very upset here as they learn every few minutes of more martyrs in Gaza. We can’t put our feelings in a refrigerator and just keep watching; it is really heartbreaking watching the bodies of the children under the debris.

From Cairo, Hamas political leader Khaled Meshaal has stated:

All options are available. If Israel wants a ceasefire brokered through Egypt, then that is possible. Escalation is also possible, especially as there are differences in Israeli statements. We are prepared and ready for all options.

According to Reuters reporting, Meshaal is for a truce if demands are met, demands that include an end to Israel’s attacks and an end to the siege.

Highly recommend staying updated with The Guardian’s ever-excellent live blog, and making sure you read more than what I’ve put up here, which is just a brief snapshot. And check out the Reuters live blog for a live feed of the Gaza City skyline

Photos: Gaza City/Bernat Armangue/AP; Shurooq media building in Gaza City/Paul Danahar; remains of a Hamas building in Gaza City/Yasser Gdeeh/Reuters; Hamas rockets sent toward Israel/Mohammed Saber/EPA; Gaza City residents flee their homes following an airstrike/Bernat Armangue/AP

via thepoliticalnotebook

*Tragic. 

Reblogged from The Political Notebook.

Comments (View)

Jun 29th, 2012 @ 5:54 am

STUDY: Kardashians Get 40 Times More News Coverage Than Ocean Acidification

Ocean acidification, which is currently at levels of 30% acidity and rising, has been called “global warming’s evil twin” and may be even more deadly and destructive than global warming itself, yet it receives very little media coverage. This is a huge media fail.
via mohandasgandhi

*In all fairness, I feel like the Kardashians will destroy our society way before ocean acidification.

STUDY: Kardashians Get 40 Times More News Coverage Than Ocean Acidification

Ocean acidification, which is currently at levels of 30% acidity and rising, has been called “global warming’s evil twin” and may be even more deadly and destructive than global warming itself, yet it receives very little media coverage. This is a huge media fail.

via mohandasgandhi

*In all fairness, I feel like the Kardashians will destroy our society way before ocean acidification.

Reblogged from crooked indifference.

Comments (View)

May 19th, 2012 @ 3:14 pm

PBS stations need to "become YouTube of local community," Seiken says

*There is a void of localized content right now. Could be such a huge platform. 

Seiken’s vision involves using PBS national platforms as a distribution vehicle not only for national presentations but also for local content, creating a “frictionless flow” between the two on the web, smart TVs, Android, iPhone and iPad apps. “Regardless of platform,” he said, “national builds it at scale, local populates it with content, and the audience sees content from both national and local.” The crowd liked that notion, stopping Seiken with applause.

He said stations need to “massively expand their video footprint” within their communities, and PBS Interactive is exploring tools and techniques for low-cost, high-quality production. Seiken cited the Off Book project as one early example. The 13-part web series on experimental and nontraditional art forms on PBSArts.org launched last July and costs just $600 a minute to produce, he said. It’s averaging 70,000 video views per episode, “which is more than most primetime episodes.” 

Such innovation “is public TV’s birthright,” he told the crowd. “It’s something we were created to do but never had resources to accomplish. Now the world has changed, and production costs are plummeting. We have the brands. We have the video pedigree. This is our moment.”

But there is another future, he said, which is “frankly, more likely. It’s easier to just embrace what we humans love best — the status quo.”
via shaneguiter

Reblogged from Shane's Blog.

Comments (View)

Mar 2nd, 2012 @ 12:59 pm


This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
The Free Syrian Army has cut a retreat from the strategic city of Homs, after 26 days of siege by Assad’s forces. The Red Cross will be allowed in today to the Baba Amro quarter.
Thirteen Syrians died getting injured Sunday Times photographer Paul Conroy out of the country. His colleague, wounded Le Figaro journalist Edith Bouvier, is currently in Beirut and is expected to return home today.
Rémi Ochlik and Marie Colvin have reportedly been buried in Syria. 
Mother Jones obtained a 718-page Syrian government “hit list” containing thousands of names.
The Pentagon revealed part of a deal struck with Guantanamo detainee Majid Khan, whose arraignment was Wednesday, to postpone his sentencing until 2016. Khan, a former Baltimore resident and alleged courier, pleaded guilty to five war crimes. He has promised cooperation and in exchange, his sentencing four years from now will be for no more than 19 years in prison. The deal he has struck requires him to reveal “complete and accurate information in interviews, depositions and testimony wherever and whenever requested by the prosecutors.”
Nuclear talks in Pyongyang went surprisingly well, with North Korea engaging in what would appear to be a stark policy shift and agreeing to halt their nuclear program and allow IAEA inspection in exchange for food aid.
A review of a new book: Warfare in Independent Africa.
A poor, unfortunate man who shares a name with senior Al-Qaeda official Saif Al-Adel was detained at Cairo’s airport.
There was a lot (a lot) of discussion about Obama and section 1022 of the NDAA. The White House on Tuesday in Presidential Policy Directive 14, created a set of rules that essentially waive much of that controversial section of the defense legislation involving military custody for terror suspects. Weighing in on this: Lawfare, Forbes, The Atlantic, Lawfare, Huffington Post.
In related news, The Washington Post reports this morning that the military commissions system is now a place of relative leniency for detainees facing charges.
How much does it cost the US to keep one soldier in Afghanistan for a year? $850,000.
The remains of the last American servicemember to be MIA in Iraq, Staff Sgt. Ahmed Kousay al-Taie, have been identified. He was an Army interpreter and was kidnapped at gunpoint in Baghdad in 2006.
The Taliban and NATO got into yet another snarky Twitter battle.
Things got more heated between Sudan and South Sudan as Khartoum bombed two oil wells deep inside it’s southern counterpart’s territory and is massing troops at the border.
The US detention center at Bagram Air Field has had a horrible and embarrassing history: from the beating deaths of two detainees and reports of secret torture chambers to the recent unrest-inducing Quran burnings.
An excellent blog post up at SWAN about media narratives on female veterans.
Panetta has asked for another review of Madigan Army Medical Center, whose behavioral program is under scrutiny for changing PTSD diagnoses.
Photo: 10 Feb, 2012. Afghan border police and Marines board a CH-53D Sea Stallion helicopter near Combat Outpost Torbert at the start of Operation Shahem Tohan (Eagle Storm), scouring highways for insurgents and smugglers. Cpl. Reece Lodder/USMC.

via thepoliticalnotebook

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: 10 Feb, 2012. Afghan border police and Marines board a CH-53D Sea Stallion helicopter near Combat Outpost Torbert at the start of Operation Shahem Tohan (Eagle Storm), scouring highways for insurgents and smugglers. Cpl. Reece Lodder/USMC.

via thepoliticalnotebook

Reblogged from The Political Notebook.

Comments (View)

Feb 4th, 2012 @ 9:13 am

Syria Update

“It’s a real massacre in every sense of the word. I saw bodies of women and children lying on roads beheaded. It’s horrible and inhuman. It was a long night helping people get to hospitals.”Abu Jihad, Khalidiya resident

“We are not getting any help, there are no ambulances or anything. We are removing the people with our own hands. […] We have dug out at least 100 bodies so far, they are placed in the two mosques.” - anonymous Syrian activist

“We were sitting inside our house when we started hearing the shelling. We felt shells were falling on our heads.” - Waleed, Khalidiya resident

“It does not seem that they get it. Even if they kill 10 million of us, the people will not stop until we topple him.” - anonymous Syrian resident

As many as 260 people have been killed since Friday across Homs, Syria, according to several opposition groups, marking the deadliest day of violence since anti-government protests began in mid-March.

The UN Security Council will meet Saturday morning to vote on a resolution condemning the Syrian government’s violent response to the ongoing protests.

Multiple Syrian embassies across Europe and the Middle East were attacked by demonstrators Friday and Saturday to protest the recent assault on anti-Assad activists in Syria.

This month marks the 30th anniversary of the massacre in Hama, Syria. In February 1982, President Hafez Assad, Bashar Assad’s father attempted to crush a rebellion by shelling the city of Hama and bringing in bulldozers to destroy the neighborhood. An estimated 20,000 people were killed over three weeks. 

[Photos: A Syrian rebel stands next to a destroyed government forces tank decorated with Syrian revolution flags in Homs, Syria, on Wednesday. Credit: Local Coordination Committee; A boy holds up a sign during an anti-regime demonstration in the Syrian village of al-Qsair, on Friday. Credit: Alessio Romenzi/AFP/Getty Images; Signs of damage are visible at the Syrian embassy in central London on Saturday, after protestors broke into the embassy. Credit: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images]

via pantslessprogressive

(Source: pantslessprogressive)

Reblogged from Firth of Forth.

Comments (View)

Jan 14th, 2012 @ 5:12 am


Urination at War: Don’t Be Mad at the Peeing; Be Mad at the Killing
What a world we live in, a world in which peeing on dead people yields more moral outrage than killing them in the first place.
Read more on GOOD→
via good

Urination at War: Don’t Be Mad at the Peeing; Be Mad at the Killing

What a world we live in, a world in which peeing on dead people yields more moral outrage than killing them in the first place.

Read more on GOOD→

via good

Reblogged from .

Comments (View)

Dec 31st, 2011 @ 11:44 am

picturesofwar:

“Shin Dong-hyuk, a North Korean defector, shows scars on his leg during a press conference in Seoul, 29 October 2007. He said he was injured while fleeing a prison camp where he was born and spent 22 years.”
Note: This is the the only person to have been born and raised in a North Korean prison camp and to have escaped to the West.  His story has been translated into English and will be released in March of 2012.

picturesofwar:

“Shin Dong-hyuk, a North Korean defector, shows scars on his leg during a press conference in Seoul, 29 October 2007. He said he was injured while fleeing a prison camp where he was born and spent 22 years.”

Note: This is the the only person to have been born and raised in a North Korean prison camp and to have escaped to the West.  His story has been translated into English and will be released in March of 2012.

Reblogged from Sabr, brown one.

Comments (View)

Dec 24th, 2011 @ 1:00 pm

thepoliticalnotebook:

Tens of thousands of Russians are currently protesting in Moscow… rallying against election fraud and the 12-year rule of Vladimir Putin. You’re probably wondering about what Putin is wearing on his head in that protest sign… That’s a condom. Aside from the fact it’s simply ridiculously funny (quick, somebody start a Tumblr of pictures of hated world leaders with condoms on their heads), it’s in reference to a comment he himself made a few weeks ago about the white ribbons worn by the protesters:

To be honest, when I saw on the TV screens what some people had attached to themselves, it’s not very polite, I thought it was an anti-AIDS campaign; I thought that they had stuck condoms on themselves.

The second picture gives you a little bit of a sense of exactly how big a crowd is rallying in Moscow, chanting “Russia without Putin!” and “New elections!” 

Photo 1: Tatyna Makeyeva/Reuters. Photo 2: Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Read the stories at MSNBC and the Guardian.

Reblogged from The Political Notebook.

Comments (View)

Archive · RSS · Theme by Novembird