This is me.

Darin...

Following

Search


radoration.

an adoration of all things rad

Dec 9th, 2012 @ 10:16 am

How to Make a Baby by photographer Patrice Laroche and Sandra Denis, the mother of his new baby daughter Justine.

via sosuperawesome

Reblogged from What Is This I Don't Even.

Comments (View)

Jun 27th, 2012 @ 6:42 am

The Iris Camera is controlled by your eye, and shoots exactly what you see!

It uses biometric technology (think face recognition) to detect where your eye is looking through the lens and capture a frame based off of that. It was designed by Mimi Zou.

Watch the vid to see it in action.

The Iris Camera Shoots Exactly What  You See 

via NotCot via photojojo

Reblogged from .

Comments (View)

Jun 18th, 2012 @ 3:30 pm

Falling Petals, Japan

National Geographic’s Photo of the Day, by Hisao Mogi:

I sat down on a stump for a rest after a stroll in Nara Park and watched the deer. They were eating fallen cherry blossom petals peacefully. Suddenly a strong wind blew and cherry blossom petals started to fall on the deer. It was like a shower of cherry blossom petals. In Japanese, it is called hana fubuki, which means flower snowstorm.

National Geographic

Falling Petals, Japan

National Geographic’s Photo of the Day, by Hisao Mogi:

I sat down on a stump for a rest after a stroll in Nara Park and watched the deer. They were eating fallen cherry blossom petals peacefully. Suddenly a strong wind blew and cherry blossom petals started to fall on the deer. It was like a shower of cherry blossom petals. In Japanese, it is called hana fubuki, which means flower snowstorm.

National Geographic

Comments (View)

@ 7:20 am

A Bee Sting

UC Davis Communications Specialist Kathy Keatley Garvey in the Department of Entomology said she’s taken at least 1 million photos of honeybees in her lifetime, but this snapshot won the first-place gold feature photo award in an Association for Communication Excellence competition.
An opportune time came for Garvey to capture this photo when she was walking with a friend and a bee came close to him and starting buzzing in a high-pitch. She said that’s normally a telltale sign that a bee’s about to sting, so she readied her camera and snapped four photos.
The images represented the progression of the sting, but the most interesting part was that the bee’s abdominal tissue that lingered behind, she said.
“As far as I know, nobody’s been able to record anything like this.”

A Bee Sting

UC Davis Communications Specialist Kathy Keatley Garvey in the Department of Entomology said she’s taken at least 1 million photos of honeybees in her lifetime, but this snapshot won the first-place gold feature photo award in an Association for Communication Excellence competition.

An opportune time came for Garvey to capture this photo when she was walking with a friend and a bee came close to him and starting buzzing in a high-pitch. She said that’s normally a telltale sign that a bee’s about to sting, so she readied her camera and snapped four photos.

The images represented the progression of the sting, but the most interesting part was that the bee’s abdominal tissue that lingered behind, she said.

“As far as I know, nobody’s been able to record anything like this.”

Comments (View)

Jun 8th, 2012 @ 10:52 am

Absolutely striking photography of star trails taken from the International Space Station as it orbits Earth at 17,000 mph. See full set here.

(via)

via curiositycounts

Reblogged from curiosity counts.

Comments (View)

Jun 4th, 2012 @ 8:54 pm

The Cataracts by Andrew McConnell

Here in The Cataracts, Irish photographer Andrew McConnell braves the rapids of the Congo River to document the amazing Wagenia fishermen going about their daily catch—a livelihood that goes back centuries. Andrew takes the viewer into the midst of this drama: he is literally in the churning water, and in some pictures captures the perspective of the fish being caught.

For some of the shots I used a waterproof housing so that I could get low in the water and get a different perspective. I didn’t use the housing when I was on the tolimos because it made shooting very difficult. And after a while I didn’t use it in the pirogues (wooden canoes) either because, even though we were navigating some heavy white water, I found that the fishermen were so skillful at steering through the rapids that I never felt worried about capsizing—in fact, I barely got wet. Much to my astonishment a fisherman would sometimes dive into a raging torrent and just as I’d be thinking, my God we’ll never see that guy again, he would pop up beside a pirogue 30 yards away.

Andrew has traveled extensively, and his work covers a range of subjects. His enigmatic portraits, called The Last Colony,” document Sahrawi refugees and won the World Press Photo award for Portraits in 2011. Surf’s Up in Gaza ran in Newsweek International and won the Society of Publication Designers award in the category for Feature: News/Reportage.

For Andrew’s full account of shooting “The Cataracts,” read an interview here. And visit our Tumblr’s page to watch a wonderful short film he made about this project.

via picturedept

Reblogged from .

Comments (View)

Apr 19th, 2012 @ 7:14 pm

24 hours on the little planet

Chris Kotsiopoulos merged photos taken over a 24 hour period, the result is this stunning image!
This is a 24 hour little planet panorama! I was wondering if it is possible to visualize a full day on a photo. I finally decided to give it a try! Role the mouse over the picture to see the annotations. See the picture in higher resolution. You can view the 11 hour startrail in a timelapse video. A detailed tutorial is available here.

24 hours on the little planet

Chris Kotsiopoulos merged photos taken over a 24 hour period, the result is this stunning image!

This is a 24 hour little planet panorama! I was wondering if it is possible to visualize a full day on a photo. I finally decided to give it a try! Role the mouse over the picture to see the annotations. See the picture in higher resolution. You can view the 11 hour startrail in a timelapse video. A detailed tutorial is available here.

Comments (View)

Apr 10th, 2012 @ 5:39 pm

From his morning-time perch above the southbound lanes of Highway 85 in Monterrey, Mexico, photographer Alejandro Cartagena catches images of people on their way to work.

via leftist-linguaphilenewsweek

Reblogged from words of love and despair.

Comments (View)

Apr 9th, 2012 @ 5:29 pm

Stratocam: Enjoy the best Google Maps satellite imagery around the world

Comments (View)

Apr 8th, 2012 @ 8:38 pm

360 Degree Photos of Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN 360º PANORAMA. Photographed by Harbert F. Austin Jr. from the roof of the Kodo elementary School October, 1945. Location: Nekoya-cho. Distance from hypocenter: approx. 760m. The start of restoration work by the citizens in the aftermath of the bomb can be observed as people cross bridges, ride bicycles, and walk about.
http://blog.360cities.net/hiroshima-after-the-atomic-bomb/

360 Degree Photos of Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN 360º PANORAMA. Photographed by Harbert F. Austin Jr. from the roof of the Kodo elementary School October, 1945. Location: Nekoya-cho. Distance from hypocenter: approx. 760m. The start of restoration work by the citizens in the aftermath of the bomb can be observed as people cross bridges, ride bicycles, and walk about.

http://blog.360cities.net/hiroshima-after-the-atomic-bomb/

(Source: twitter.com)

Comments (View)

Archive · RSS · Theme by Novembird