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an adoration of all things rad

May 22nd, 2013 @ 9:00 am

Where does all our military spending go?

Outside the United States, the Pentagon controls a collection of military bases unprecedented in history. With U.S. troops gone from Iraq and the withdrawal from Afghanistan underway, it’s easy to forget that we probably still have about 1,000 military bases in other peoples’ lands. This giant collection of bases receives remarkably little media attention, costs a fortune, and even when cost cutting is the subject du jour, it still seems to get a free ride.

(Source: azspot)

Reblogged from words of love and despair.

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Mar 3rd, 2013 @ 7:26 pm

Pentagon Frets Billions in Sequester Cuts But Wastes $1.5 Trillion on Non-Working Fighter Jet

When it comes to sequester cuts, no member of the Obama administration has been more outspoken and pants-wetting that outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta. Here he is on a recent Sunday morning show:

"I have to tell you it is irresponsible for it to happen. I mean, why in God’s name would members of Congress, elected by the American people, take a step that would badly damage our national defense, but more importantly undermine the support for our men and women in uniform?…If Congress stands back and allows sequester to take place, I think it would really be a shameful and irresponsible act.”

courtesy de Rugy/Mercatus Centercourtesy de Rugy/Mercatus CenterBack in 2011,he wrote to Congress about that sequestration could under the worst-case scenario amount to “23 percent” of military spending, which is simply not true. The sequester cuts, should they happen, will at most knock a few tens of billions of dollars off this year’s base budget for Defense, bringing the total down below $500 billion.

After which point it will start rising again, despite a much-ballyhooed end to two wars that have been very expensive in terms of lives lost and treasure spent. As the nearby chart prepared by Reason columnist and Mercatus Center economist Veronique de Rugy shows, the sequester means cumulative defense spending through 2021 would total $4.8 trillion instead of $5.3 trillion. Even the U.S. government would sign off on whatever torture Panetta is using on basic math. 

And here’s a reminder: About half of the $85 billion sequester cuts will come from defense spending. But only about half of those spending cuts - $44 billion -will happen in fiscal year 2013. So we’re looking at an immediate cut in planned defense spending of something on the order of $20 billion. 

In any case, should the sequester cuts happen, they come after Defense’s base budget - which doesn’t include war spending, a variety of Homeland Security bits, and other supplemental expenditures - rose by 40 percent over the past decade or so, from $397 billion in 2001 to around $550 billion this year. Because military personnel is exempted from the sequester (as is war funding and a bunch of other stuff), there’s no reason to sweat our preparedness over such trims. And, as the Congressional Budget Office notes in its recent budget outlook document, militcourtesy National Review.courtesy National Review.ary outlays subject to budget cap limits are expected to increase from $518 billion in 2014 to $576 billion in 2021. Over the same time frame, total defense spending (which includes war spending), will jump 14 percent, rom $593 billion to $679 billion (all figures in current dollars; see Table 1-5).

Can we get a show of hands of people who would like to see their salary growth subect to such a “shameful” expansion?

*Putting the “cuts” in perspective of the F-35 just makes Congress and the DOD look like utter thieves.

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Jan 8th, 2013 @ 10:20 pm

DEFENSE SPENDING COMPOSITION, 1962 to Present

What we spend our defense spending on …
ht: Ezra Klein
via politicalprof

*I think this graph could be misleading when you take into account that many “police actions” and “war-time activities” such as the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were not funded by defense spending under Bush. They were “paid for” with separate war funding bills. Still a neat graph to show proportions.

DEFENSE SPENDING COMPOSITION, 1962 to Present

What we spend our defense spending on …

ht: Ezra Klein

via politicalprof

*I think this graph could be misleading when you take into account that many “police actions” and “war-time activities” such as the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were not funded by defense spending under Bush. They were “paid for” with separate war funding bills. Still a neat graph to show proportions.

Reblogged from words of love and despair.

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Jan 6th, 2013 @ 12:00 pm

NDAA Signed Into Law By Obama Despite Guantanamo Veto Threat, Indefinite Detention Provisions

President Barack Obama signed the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013 on Wednesday, despitehis own threatto veto it over prohibitions on closing the Guantanamo Bay prison camp.

Civil liberties advocates had roundly criticized the bill over Guantanamo and a separate section that could allow the military to indefinitely detain American citizens on suspicions of supporting terrorism. Just as he did with last year’s version of the bill, however, Obama decided that the need to pass the NDAA, which also sets the armed forces’ $633 billion budget for the 2013 fiscal year, was simply “too great to ignore,” according to a presidential signing statement released in the early morning hours Thursday.

*Bullshit. 

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Oct 7th, 2012 @ 9:08 pm

Your Tax Dollars At War

*So damn expensive! And it will rise - it always does.

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Aug 16th, 2012 @ 9:26 am

Roving Curiosity: Why NASA’s Jaw Dropping Mars Mission Is Worth Every Penny


This argument occurs, year after year, at dinner parties and in Congress alike. Every time, someone asks the question: why are we paying for NASA?

The best part (and information I am forced to broadcast whenever someone asks this):
First, the easiest part of this to answer. Those who say NASA is an economic leech have no idea how tiny a share NASA has, so here’s a quick visual. Turn a tax dollar into one hundred pennies. Pick up one penny. Now, take a pair of shears and cut off a sliver of that penny, something slightly less than half. That sliver is NASA. And the Curiosity rover? Per capita, it cost each American seven dollars. The war in Iraq, by comparison, will cost each of us around $12,000. The $850 billion Wall Street bailout cost more than NASA’s entire 54-year existence. 
Over those 54 years though, NASA has paid dividends. Any long distance communication—voice, television, data, GPS—has NASA to thank. They developed the first satellites, accomplishing that would’ve been far too risky and expensive for any private company to pioneer. The list of aviation safety and medical technologies NASA developed or helped develop is too long for this screen. Cordless appliances, LEDs, water filters, memory foam mattresses? All NASA. One out of every thousand US patents belongs to NASA. Economic studies have found that NASA generates between 3 and 7 dollars return for every 1 dollar invested. 
via estebanwaseaten: good

*Once again it comes down to priorities. If you want to deal with government waste (which I absolutely do) then you need to address medicare/medicaid and defense spending first. The majority of our spending is there. Funding NASA is way way down the list.

Roving Curiosity: Why NASA’s Jaw Dropping Mars Mission Is Worth Every Penny

This argument occurs, year after year, at dinner parties and in Congress alike. Every time, someone asks the question: why are we paying for NASA?

The best part (and information I am forced to broadcast whenever someone asks this):

First, the easiest part of this to answer. Those who say NASA is an economic leech have no idea how tiny a share NASA has, so here’s a quick visual. Turn a tax dollar into one hundred pennies. Pick up one penny. Now, take a pair of shears and cut off a sliver of that penny, something slightly less than half. That sliver is NASA. And the Curiosity rover? Per capita, it cost each American seven dollars. The war in Iraq, by comparison, will cost each of us around $12,000. The $850 billion Wall Street bailout cost more than NASA’s entire 54-year existence. 
Over those 54 years though, NASA has paid dividends. Any long distance communication—voice, television, data, GPS—has NASA to thank. They developed the first satellites, accomplishing that would’ve been far too risky and expensive for any private company to pioneer. The list of aviation safety and medical technologies NASA developed or helped develop is too long for this screen. Cordless appliances, LEDs, water filters, memory foam mattresses? All NASA. One out of every thousand US patents belongs to NASA. Economic studies have found that NASA generates between 3 and 7 dollars return for every 1 dollar invested. 
via estebanwaseatengood

*Once again it comes down to priorities. If you want to deal with government waste (which I absolutely do) then you need to address medicare/medicaid and defense spending first. The majority of our spending is there. Funding NASA is way way down the list.

Reblogged from Mostly harmless..

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May 18th, 2012 @ 8:04 am


50 years of government spending, in a single graph by Lam Thuy Vo for NPR.

*I feel like this is misleading, just because all the spending never gets cut. Everything increases but it’s nice to see the “priorities”.
via explore-blog

50 years of government spending, in a single graph by Lam Thuy Vo for NPR.

*I feel like this is misleading, just because all the spending never gets cut. Everything increases but it’s nice to see the “priorities”.

via explore-blog

Reblogged from Explore.

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Apr 4th, 2012 @ 8:39 pm

FACT: In 2011, California spent $9.6 billion on prisons, but just $5.7 billion on higher education.

California has built just one college campus since 1980, but it’s created 21 prisons. 

*As a nation, we imprison far too many people. It’s ridiculous. And we spend way too much on both prisons and universities. But if I had to choose, I’d rather waste money on education and not on locking up people for drugs.

via think-progress

(Source: CNN)

Reblogged from Sabr, brown one.

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Mar 25th, 2012 @ 11:59 am

Cut It Out! - If the American Public Were In Control of the Federal Budget

As the economy slowly recovers from a crippling recession and politicians sound alarms about mounting deficits, the U.S. government is struggling with tough choices about which programs to trim and which to invest in. 
An annual Harris Interactive poll set out to explore public opinion on the federal budget by asking people whether they would favor or oppose cutting spending in particular areas. The results reveal what really matters to the American people—and their pocketbooks.

*It’s upsetting that “Defense” or military spending is not #1 on the list of cuts. 

Cut It Out! - If the American Public Were In Control of the Federal Budget

As the economy slowly recovers from a crippling recession and politicians sound alarms about mounting deficits, the U.S. government is struggling with tough choices about which programs to trim and which to invest in. 

An annual Harris Interactive poll set out to explore public opinion on the federal budget by asking people whether they would favor or oppose cutting spending in particular areas. The results reveal what really matters to the American people—and their pocketbooks.

*It’s upsetting that “Defense” or military spending is not #1 on the list of cuts. 

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Mar 19th, 2012 @ 7:17 pm

And You Wonder Why We’re Broke?

Defense Spending Breakdown

via ilovecharts

And You Wonder Why We’re Broke?

Defense Spending Breakdown

via ilovecharts

Reblogged from I LOVE BENDER.

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