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radoration.

an adoration of all things rad

Dec 8th, 2013 @ 8:00 am

“There were pieces of my family all over the road… I picked up those pieces from the road and from the truck and wrapped them in a sheet to bury them. Do the American people want to spend their money this way, on drones that kill our women and children?”

Miya Jan, a 28-year-old farmer who found the the burning frame of his cousin’s blue pickup truck after a U.S. drone strike in Afghanistan. Inside, he said, he recognized the mangled remains of his brother, his brother’s wife and their 18-month-old son. Jan and other villagers say 14 people were killed in the attack; U.S. and Afghan officials place the toll at 11. | Afghans describe relatives’ deaths in recent U.S. drone strike (via hipsterlibertarian)

*This is why the war can never be “won”. An evil cycle.

Reblogged from The Hipster Libertarian.

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Apr 17th, 2013 @ 5:00 am

Read In Between The Lines, There Was An Uprising In Guantanamo Bay Yesterday
After a mass hunger strike by 44+ of the 166 detainees that started Feb. 6th and years of peaceful resistance, prisoners at Guantanamo Bay have had enough of the torture, indefinite detention and horrid conditions. The lawyers of the inmates insist that the hunger strike is more widespread and nearly every person at the prison is refusing to eat.
Inmates covered security camera’s and windows and used broomsticks, mop handles and makeshift batons made up of tape and water bottles to clash with guards. 
The violence erupted during an early morning raid at Camp 6 when guards attempted to end communal living and place all inmates in single cells. According to military officials, guards shot 4 ‘non lethal’ weapons at the inmates, 1 of which was injured. Though this should be taken with a grain a salt considering that Guantanamo Bay is where the military is known to torture inmates. 
It should also be noted that 87 of the prisoners at Gitmo are cleared for release and 46 other prisoners cannot be prosecuted for a ‘lack of evidence’ according to the U.S. government. In other words, over 80% of the inmates being held at Guantanamo Bay would otherwise be free. 
In January of 2013, Obama signed the NDAA 2013 which allows him to indefinitely detain American citizens without charge or trial, which is literally contradicts the constitution, and banned the government from closing Guantanamo Bay. 
Literally the only media outlet I’ve seen consistently covering this hunger strike is the Catholic Worker.
via howtofightloneliness: anarcho-queer
*So dumb. If they are criminals, prosecute them. Simple as that. Being held indefinitely without being charged is directly against what we used to stand for. 

Read In Between The Lines, There Was An Uprising In Guantanamo Bay Yesterday

After a mass hunger strike by 44+ of the 166 detainees that started Feb. 6th and years of peaceful resistance, prisoners at Guantanamo Bay have had enough of the torture, indefinite detention and horrid conditions. The lawyers of the inmates insist that the hunger strike is more widespread and nearly every person at the prison is refusing to eat.

Inmates covered security camera’s and windows and used broomsticks, mop handles and makeshift batons made up of tape and water bottles to clash with guards. 

The violence erupted during an early morning raid at Camp 6 when guards attempted to end communal living and place all inmates in single cells. According to military officials, guards shot 4 ‘non lethal’ weapons at the inmates, 1 of which was injured. Though this should be taken with a grain a salt considering that Guantanamo Bay is where the military is known to torture inmates. 

It should also be noted that 87 of the prisoners at Gitmo are cleared for release and 46 other prisoners cannot be prosecuted for a ‘lack of evidence’ according to the U.S. government. In other words, over 80% of the inmates being held at Guantanamo Bay would otherwise be free. 

In January of 2013, Obama signed the NDAA 2013 which allows him to indefinitely detain American citizens without charge or trial, which is literally contradicts the constitution, and banned the government from closing Guantanamo Bay. 

Literally the only media outlet I’ve seen consistently covering this hunger strike is the Catholic Worker.

via howtofightlonelinessanarcho-queer

*So dumb. If they are criminals, prosecute them. Simple as that. Being held indefinitely without being charged is directly against what we used to stand for. 

Reblogged from Sabr, brown one.

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Mar 25th, 2013 @ 9:44 pm


Drone war: every attack in Pakistan visualised via the Guardian.
A truly must see interactive piece.
via newsflick

*Please look at this. Very relevant. Remember, this is Pakistan… a country we are not actually at war with. Yep.

Drone war: every attack in Pakistan visualised via the Guardian.

A truly must see interactive piece.

via newsflick

*Please look at this. Very relevant. Remember, this is Pakistan… a country we are not actually at war with. Yep.

Reblogged from .

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Mar 19th, 2013 @ 8:56 pm

The Iraq War: 10 Years Later

Invading and occupying Iraq was a non sequitur in the “global war on terror.” There was no pressing military or foreign policy goal involved. The move on Iraq was a political response to the failure to capture Osama bin Laden. When you can’t lash out at an actual problem, why not take a swing at a country—especially one ruled by an absolutely unredeemable figure such as Saddam Hussein—that you’ve already effectively contained?

That’s why the Bush administration sold the war not simply as a necessary step in stemming the supposedly existential threat of radical Islam but as an affordable exercise in nation- and region-building. Remember when Bush adviser Larry Lindsey got canned for suggesting that the war might be as much as $200 billion?We’re now looking at a $6 trillion price tag, a total that pales in comparison to the human toll, which is somewhere north of 176,000 people. It’s worth constantly recounting the cost and stupidity of the Iraq war because we’ve already started to forget it.

Indeed, we started to forget just how ill conceived and poorly executed the whole thing was even before we kinda sorta left Iraq. 

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Oct 7th, 2012 @ 9:08 pm

Your Tax Dollars At War

*So damn expensive! And it will rise - it always does.

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Sep 9th, 2012 @ 9:23 pm

Deadly day in Iraq: Dozens killed, hundreds injured in series of attacks

» A constant fear: ”Because of the daily explosions, we must write…

via shortformblog

*It’s crazy how little coverage Iraq gets now. This weekend was way too violent.

Reblogged from ShortFormBlog.

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Aug 12th, 2012 @ 7:06 pm

"Invisible" Wars?

World Politics Review has a feature section in this issue on the “invisibility” of contemporary US wars, fought through covert ops, drone strikes and cyber attack rather than on conventional battlespaces. The issue is a thought-provoking read: Thomas Barnett aims a verbal fusillade at Obama’s “one-night-stand” foreign policy; scalding expositions on the illegality and perverse side effects of drone strikes come from Michael Cohen and Micah Zenko, respectively; and Steven Metz confirms the new "invisibility" of US military strategy.

Naturally, my contribution unpacks the whole notion of “invisible” war, putting it into its socio-political context:

Much digital ink has been spilled over how cyber and unmanned technologies are changing the nature of war, allowing it to be fought more secretly, more subversively and with greater discretion. But the single biggest shift in the sociology of war in the past quarter-century has been not in the way it is fought, but in the relationship between its grim realities and the perceptions of those on the home front. Indeed, it is precisely the increasing visibility of ordinary warfare due to communications technology that is driving U.S. efforts to redefine the rules of engagement. And ironically, this is resulting in an unraveling of old normative understandings about how to achieve human security.

Check out the whole set of essays here.

*How can we claim to be a nation at war when the media and military actively work to hide the consequences of our actions? So many of our problems can start to be fixed through context and clarity.

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Aug 11th, 2012 @ 8:55 am

“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.

The cost of one modern heavy bomber is this: a modern brick school in more than 30 cities. It is two electric power plants, each serving a town of 60,000 population. It is two fine, fully equipped hospitals. It is some fifty miles of concrete pavement. We pay for a single fighter plane with a half million bushels of wheat. We pay for a single destroyer with new homes that could have housed more than 8,000 people.

This is, I repeat, the best way of life to be found on the road the world has been taking. This is not a way of life at all, in any true sense. Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron.”

President Eisenhower, Chance for Peace speech 16 Apr 1953 (via demons)

Reblogged from Once Upon a Time in War.

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@ 5:56 am

Rory Stewart: Time to end the war in Afghanistan.

Very good talk, Please watch and share.

British MP Rory Stewart walked across Afghanistan after 9/11, talking with citizens and warlords alike. Now, a decade later, he asks: Why are Western and coalition forces still fighting there? He shares lessons from past military interventions that worked — Bosnia, for instance — and shows that humility and local expertise are the keys to success.

This idea that failure is not an option: It makes failure invisible, inconceivable and inevitable.” (Rory Stewart on the war in Afghanistan)
This is actually really informative, watch it. 

via musaaferwatanafghanistan

*Relevant context for the Afghanistan war. It is about priorities. And the facts point to ending this devastating occupation. 

Reblogged from Sabr, brown one.

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Aug 9th, 2012 @ 6:00 pm

Judith Miller: Ironist

Last night Jon Stewart took on the current campaign against government leaks by looking at a statement that Judith Miller, former New York Times reporter and current Fox News contributor, made over the weekend.

To wit: “These leaks, especially the kind of leaks that are being investigated now by not one but two special prosecutors, they are truly injurious to the national security… they make it harder to make foreign policy.”

Miller, of course, is famous for leaks. Her reports leading up to and immediately after the start of the Iraq War were filled with leaks from anonymous government sources about Iraq’s ongoing Weapons of Mass Destruction programs, and the existence of WMD in Iraq itself. Needless to say, these weren’t quite leaks, they were government plants that got front page play despite being entirely incorrect.

In a 2004 Editors Note, the Times outlined its erroneous reporting in the run-up to the war and while they don’t mention Miller by name, the majority of the articles they point to are hers.

Fast forward and Miller again used leaks when she outed Valerie Plame as a CIA agent when Plame’s husband became an increasingly vocal critic of the Bush administration.

In an astonishing 2005 look in the mirror, the New York Times ran a 6,000 plus page article examining Miller’s role in the Plame case, as well as her reporting on WMD in Iraq.

While not directly calling Miller a Bush administration shill, they noted that others did: “Critics said The Times was protecting not a whistle-blower but an administration campaign intended to squelch dissent.”

Ms. Miller had written a string of articles before the war - often based on the accounts of Bush administration officials and Iraqi defectors - strongly suggesting that Saddam Hussein was developing these weapons of mass destruction.

When no evidence of them was found, her reporting, along with that of some other journalists, came under fire. She was accused of writing articles that helped the Bush administration make its case for war.

“I told her there was unease, discomfort, unhappiness over some of the coverage,” said Roger Cohen, who was the foreign editor at the time. “There was concern that she’d been convinced in an unwarranted way, a way that was not holding up, of the possible existence of W.M.D.”

Writing a few days later, the Times’ Maureen Dowd had this to say:

Judy’s stories about W.M.D. fit too perfectly with the White House’s case for war. She was close to Ahmad Chalabi, the con man who was conning the neocons to knock out Saddam so he could get his hands on Iraq, and I worried that she was playing a leading role in the dangerous echo chamber that Senator Bob Graham, now retired, dubbed “incestuous amplification.” Using Iraqi defectors and exiles, Mr. Chalabi planted bogus stories with Judy and other credulous journalists…

…Judy admitted in the story that she “got it totally wrong” about W.M.D. “If your sources are wrong,” she said, “you are wrong.” But investigative reporting is not stenography.

This stenography bit is important. Yesterday we noted Bill Keller’s take on the current hyperventilating over leaks. While looking back at the Times’ Iraq WMD reporting, he writes:

But this is a good time to look a little harder at the journalists who got it right. How did they come up with the evidence to refute the version embraced by the president, by most officials in both parties and by a lot of the mainstream media?

They got it from government officials with access to classified information, who risked their jobs to confide the truth to journalists. Critics call these “leaks,” although such stories hardly ever spill out unbidden; they are painstakingly assembled by teasing out bits of information, triangulating, correcting, testing, confirming.

So yes, leaks can be “truly injurious” if you do them the Judith Miller way. Done right, as Keller explains, and they’re a “public service”.

via futurejournalismproject

*In case the world forgot, The Daily Show reminds us that Judith Miller is at best a terrible journalist without a sense of irony and at worst an active liar for the Bush administration who helped push us into war.

Reblogged from The FJP.

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